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Sing

strawman fallacy and secundum quid

I was wondering whether strawman fallacy is another name for secundum quid. They both involve oversimplification. Do I understand it correctly? Thank you very much.

asked on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 05:49:47 AM by Sing

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Answers

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Rationalissimus of the Elenchus
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Firstly there are quite a few fallacies involving oversimplification or overly simple thought processes- causal reductionism, hasty generalisation, secundum quid, and sometimes the strawman fallacy, among others. But that leads to my next point.

A strawman may involve making a simple argument more complicated too, so it seems unrealistic or lofty. The outcome is to misrepresent the argument, however that misrepresentation comes about.

answered on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 07:35:13 AM by Rationalissimus of the Elenchus

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Sing writes:

Thank you very much!

posted on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 12:06:21 PM
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Rationalissimus of the Elenchus writes:
[To Sing]

No problem.

[ login to reply ] posted on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 01:54:47 PM
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Bo Bennett, PhD
3

Secundum quid is more synonymous with the accident fallacy . Have a look at this definition and examples and you can see the differences.

answered on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 07:07:45 AM by Bo Bennett, PhD

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Sing writes:

Thank you very much!

posted on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 12:10:00 PM
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Dr. Richard
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I'd put it under a hasty generalization (fallacy of insufficient statistics, fallacy of insufficient sample, fallacy of the lonely fact, leaping to a conclusion, hasty induction, converse accident), e.g., basing a broad conclusion on a small sample.

answered on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 10:48:20 AM by Dr. Richard

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Sing writes:

Thank you very much!

posted on Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 12:14:02 PM