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Conspiracy Theory

(also known as: canceling hypothesis, canceling hypotheses, cover-ups)

Description: Explaining that your claim cannot be proven or verified because the truth is being hidden and/or evidence destroyed by a group of two or more people.  When that reason is challenged as not being true or accurate, the challenge is often presented as just another attempt to cover up the truth and presented as further evidence that the original claim is true.

Logical Form:

A is true.

B is why the truth cannot be proven.

Therefore, A is true.

Example #1:

Noah’s ark has been found by the Russian government a long time ago, but because of their hate for religion, they have been covering it up ever since.

Example #2:

Geologists and scientists all over the world are discovering strong evidence for a 6000-year-old earth, yet because of the threat of ruining their reputation, they are suppressing the evidence and keeping quiet.

Explanation: The psychology behind conspiracy theories is quite complex and involves many different cognitive biases and fallacies discussed in this book.  In general, people tend to overlook the incredible improbabilities involved in a large-scale conspiracy, as well as the potential risks for all involved in the alleged cover-up.  In the above examples, those who stick with a literal interpretation of the Bible often experience cognitive dissonance, or the mental struggle involved when one’s beliefs contradict factual claims.  This cognitive dissidence causes people to create conspiracy theories, like the ones above, to change facts to match their beliefs, rather than changing their beliefs to match facts.

Exception: Sometimes, there really are conspiracies and cover-ups.  The more evidence one can present for a cover-up, the better, but we must remember that possibility does not equal probability.

Tip: Take time to question any conspiracy theories in which you believe are true.  Do the research with an open mind.

References:

Barkun, M. (2006). A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America. University of California Press.



Registered User Comments

JD Harness
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 11:26:42 AM
Perhaps one counter-argument is that there is a weaker form of this argument which may not be a logical fallacy:

1.A is true
2.B is why A cannot be disproved
3.Therefore, A is not a scientific theory

If so, then isn’t the real issue whether reducing the strength of conspiracy theories’ claims is fatal to conspiracy theories? Perhaps one way of showing it is not fatal is by showing that other credible propositions take a similar form. I think there are many claims that do not rise to the level of scientific theories, yet are reasonably endorsed by many credible people. For example, it seems like many if not most interpretations of history take this form, and yet the discipline of history is not universally discredited. And many legal claims – specifically, those propositions put to a court or jury as decider of fact – seem to take this form, as well, yet are nonetheless given the weight of law, up to and including capital punishment. More generally, how many of a given person’s beliefs about the world do not rise to the level of a scientific theory, yet are reasonably believed nonetheless? It seems that the proportion may be high.

If the counter-counter argument were to be that the counter argument is irrelevant to the initial claim, then perhaps a useful response to that counter-counter argument is that the initial argument is a red herring. Dismissing “conspiracy theories” in general is a not a good idea simply because they are misconstrued or misapplied by illogical people.

Clearly, the terms "conspiracy" and "theory" should not be co-applied, but I do believe there is historical evidence supporting the claim that the misleading term “conspiracy theory” was put forward and promoted by the CIA.

All this is to say nothing of another potential counter-argument, to the effect that a claim of conspiracy does not necessarily have to imply that the claim cannot be disproved.

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David Blomstrom
Monday, May 06, 2019 - 12:22:34 AM
Wow, this discussion has really probed the conspiracy maze.

We can see how the fallacy fallacy can be a sort of paradox: A person who claims an event was conspiratorial can further claim the logical fallacies in the official narrative bolster his case. If someone presents a counter-argument, he can claim they're working for the dark side.

It sounds pretty flaky, except 1) conspiracy is extremely common, 2) the official narratives are generally studded with fallacies, and 3) anyone who asks too many questions will very likely wind up going to head with a propagandist who knows how to play games with the truth.

Your statement that the term "conspiracy theory" was minted by the CIA is an interesting claim I've heard before. I wonder if it's true, or if it's just a bogus claim made in order to discredit conspiracy theory?

Either way, I think the term is perfectly acceptable. In fact, I think the best way to fight the propaganda machine is to get right in their face and not let them dictate our vocabulary.

The words conspiracy and plot are virtual synonyms, and anyone who has studied history knows people have been plotting against each other for thousands of years. As cultural evolution and technology advance, it's only logical that conspiracy/plotting has advanced from relatives trying to seize a throne to collusion between multiple agencies, multi-national corporations and diverse national governments.

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Tim Eason
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 02:24:19 PM
@David Blomstrom: so let’s clear something up. First is nomenclature. When we call something a “conspiracy theory fallacy” it is not to say it’s a fallacy because it forwards a conspiracy. Iran contra was a conspiracy. Watergate was a conspiracy. Like “no true Scotsman” and “fallacy of the beard” the name comes from an example of the fallacy.
The conspiracy theory fallacy happens when someone uses the lack evidence as proof. That’s it! This is common in government conspiracies as people point to the lack of evidence as proof that the government is suppressing evidence.
Next is the fallacy fallacy or argument from fallacy when you point to someone’s fallacy as proof they are wrong. Poor logic doesn’t mean an incorrect conclusion just as proper logic doesn’t necessarily mean a correct conclusion.
Third is use of “scientific theory” which is essentially as close to fact as you can get. This has nothing to do with using proper logic as your logic can be correct but your terms can be incorrect.
For example
1 the tooth fairy will exchange money for my tooth
2 I put a lost tooth under my pillow
3 tomorrow when I wake up there will be a quarter under my pillow

The logic is sound and the conclusion is even correct.

When we use correct logic, we learn where to direct, explore, and examine the source of disagreements.
When we use poor logic, we fail to see our errors and carry on blissfully ignorant, unable to understand the world around us.

Logic is a strategy, not an indicator of truth. Logic will, however, allow you to evaluate arguments and dismiss those that prove nothing.

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David Blomstrom
Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - 08:46:11 PM
@Tim Eason:

The conspiracy theory fallacy happens when someone uses the lack evidence as proof.

I'm confused. I very clearly stated that a fallacy is EVIDENCE, not proof. So who are you talking to?

That’s it! This is common in government conspiracies as people point to the lack of evidence as proof that the government is suppressing evidence.

Logic time: Government officials do suppress evidence, therefore, you would expect to have a hard time finding evidence. Kind of a Catch-22, but that's reality, and a lack of evidence can indeed be used as EVIDENCE.

Next is the fallacy fallacy or argument from fallacy when you point to someone’s fallacy as proof they are wrong.

Again, who are you talking to?

For example
1 the tooth fairy will exchange money for my tooth
2 I put a lost tooth under my pillow
3 tomorrow when I wake up there will be a quarter under my pillow

Wow, that's the cutest little example of sandbox logic I've ever seen. And I would tend to agree that it not only proves nothing but qualifies as poor evidence to boot.

Now let's try a more mature type of logic: A commercial airliner flies low over a major city without being photographed. It then crashes into what may be the most important building on the planet, again without being photographed.

We replaced your tooth fairy with a commercial airliner, and we replaced your quarter with photographs. And we now have some rather convincing evidence.

The logic is sound and the conclusion is even correct.

You mean you actually got a quarter? Congratulations.

When we use poor logic, we fail to see our errors and carry on blissfully ignorant, unable to understand the world around us.

Well, I'm glad the tooth fairy has put you on the path to enlightenment.

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David Blomstrom
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 08:45:29 PM
This is confusing, because there are genuine conspiracies (e.g. Watergate, 9/11). Imagine if you wrote a book and some organization really was trying to discredit it or limit its distribution. You tell your readers that there's a conspiracy to discredit your book, and someone then accuses you of exploiting the conspiracy theory fallacy?

How would you defend yourself? Would you just say, "I'm aware that some people exploit conspiracy theory, but this is the real thing - it's a genuine conspiracy"?

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Friday, May 03, 2019 - 06:20:38 AM
@Petra Liverani:

It is very easy to prove that 9/11 was an inside conspiracy by pointing out the logical fallacies in the official story.

This first sentence alone clearly demonstrates the problem with your reasoning. Logical fallacies don't make the claim false and certainly don't "prove" competing claims true. As for everything else you wrote, I will let others take the bait if they so choose.

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Petra Liverani
Friday, May 03, 2019 - 08:56:30 PM
@Bo Bennett, PhD: I screwed up, didn't I? But then in dismissing my argument perhaps you're guilty of the fallacy fallacy? Not included in yours but here it is:

https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/the-fallacy-fallacy
You presumed that because a claim has been poorly argued, or a fallacy has been made, that the claim itself must be wrong.
It is entirely possible to make a claim that is false yet argue with logical coherency for that claim, just as it is possible to make a claim that is true and justify it with various fallacies and poor arguments.

Example: Recognising that Amanda had committed a fallacy in arguing that we should eat healthy food because a nutritionist said it was popular, Alyse said we should therefore eat bacon double cheeseburgers every day.

If we delete the first sentence that contains my logical fallacy I think my argument works - but perhaps you can detect another logical fallacy?

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 06:18:28 AM
@Petra Liverani:

I screwed up, didn't I? But then in dismissing my argument perhaps you're guilty of the fallacy fallacy? Not included in yours

Actually, your claim

It is very easy to prove that 9/11 was an inside conspiracy by pointing out the logical fallacies in the official story.

is a perfect example of the fallacy fallacy, also known as argument from fallacy (listed on our site). Here is the important part: had I said anything remotely similar to you in that "because you made a fallacy everything you wrote was wrong" then I, too, would be guilty of this. I did not.

This isn't the place to argue for your favorite conspiracy theory and not my place to attempt to defend the default position. I do welcome you to post your argument on our forum to get feedback from the community: https://www.logicallyfallacious.com/tools/qa/Bo/LogicalFallacies. I try to address only logical fallacies here and avoid taking a position on arguments when I can (but sometimes I do, because I am only human).

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Petra Liverani
Sunday, May 05, 2019 - 07:56:58 AM
@Bo Bennett, PhD: Yes, you are right. You didn't dismiss my argument so you were not committing the fallacy fallacy (argument from fallacy). It's such a relief to have a discussion with someone whose beliefs oppose mine and yet have it stay on a logical basis. The vast majority of people do not keep their argument to a logical basis but are guided by beliefs and emotions - and that includes every self-styled skeptic I have engaged with whose narrow mindedness and complete lack of logic in argument is utterly shameful.
I have just bought your book on Kindle.

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David Blomstrom
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 02:13:56 PM
@Petra Liverani: However...the sheer magnitude of the fallacies (not to mention outright lies, lies of omission, etc.) in the official narrative is very potent EVIDENCE that the government and media are lying. The BS is but one category of evidence that does prove quite conclusively that 9/11 isn't what we were told it was. Of course, the word "prove" can be a problem. Many people don't consider anything proved unless they have a court conviction or a signed confession.

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Petra Liverani
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 11:34:56 PM
@David Blomstrom: You don't need a court conviction, goodness me, the physics and the evidence of fakery are far too obvious. Plus they actually do tell us quite deliberately. Not content with the in-your-face Emperor's New Clothes preposterous story of 19 barely-(if-at-all)-trained terrorists, hijacking four airliners to lumber around the world's best-defended airspace unmolested by a single interceptor to target three iconic buildings, bringing two of them, 110-storey, 500,000-ton steel frame skyscrapers crashing to the ground in 12 seconds from jet fuel fires in turn leading to the perfect 6.5 second implosion of another 47-storey steel frame skyscraper from office fires, they actually further push it in our faces with a number of other ludicrous elements:

--- the nose cone of the second 200-ton airliner not only penetrates but pops out the other side of the 500,000-ton steel frame building, confirmed by a witness and freelancer for Fox, Mark Walsh, on the ground who, in very anomalously excited and smug fashion after such an horrific event, confirms seeing the plane "ream right into the side of the twin tower exploding through the other side". They didn't need this for their terror story, this was entirely gratuitous.
Nose cone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WH5InKzdQHw
Mark Walsh - https://youtu.be/f-pLwI7dcQ0?t=56s

--- Hani Hanjour was the least-likely terrorist of the band chosen to perform the breathtaking 330-degree manoeuvre into the Pentagon. His alleged flight instructor tells us (in a disguised voice to maintain anonymity) that little Hani would cry when he was instructed to attempt stalls and steep turns. Gratuitous.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8o7tr-VE2Uo

--- We are shown few images of dead people which is not unexpected, however, a particularly gruesome one of a jumper who has hit the pavement is obviously fake and is reminiscent of a scarecrow with the stuffing taken out. They could have done a much better job of the fakery.
See Point 3C at https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/3000-dead-and-6000-injured-a-lie.html

Dialogue after the collapse of WTC-7 at 5:20pm on 9/11 at the World Trade Centre
Brian Williams, MSNBC News Anchor and David Restuccio, FDNY EMS Lieutenant
"Can you confirm that it was No 7 that just went in?" ["Went in" is a term used in controlled demolition that comes from the fact that the buildings fall in on themselves.]
"Yes, sir."
"And you guys knew this was comin' all day."
"We had heard reports that the building was unstable and that eventually it would either come down on its own or it would be taken down."
Entirely gratuitous.
https://youtu.be/i5b719rVpds?t=224

--- Jane Standley announced on BBC television that WTC-7 had collapsed 20 minutes before it did. How is this possible for an unplanned collapse by fire? Gratuitous.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0HPqd8dPeE

--- Larry Silverstein, the owner of WTC-7, says he said to "pull it", a term used in controlled demolition that no doubt originates in pulling buildings down using ropes and chains. Obviously, it wouldn't have been at his command the building came down, it would have all been pre-planned, his words are just one of their "signs".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZlmHvd_RZU

Terrorists popped up alive - This is a good one, no? Nothing could be more gratuitous.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1559151.stm

We do have to respect the power elite in this way.
--- They always give us clear signs when they're hoaxing us
--- They never provide a piece of their fakery so convincingly that it can be used by a believer of their story to defend it
https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/they-tell-us-clearly.html

And I have to say they are far more scrupulous in staging their events in this manner than their critics and defenders alike are in applying their minds to them. Far more scrupulous. It drives me utterly crazy how illogical and evidence-averse people on both sides of the conspiracy fence can be be. Utterly crazy. I'm just so sick of not being able to reason with people. We are having the worst bushfires in Australia ever - it's really, really scary and no rain in sight - and still people are arguing that it's not related to man-made climate change.

Great video someone emailed me just a couple of days ago - in two conversations a week apart, Allan Weisbecker discusses the second plane with famous sports photographer, Walter Iooss. In the first conversation Walter is all on board with the fakery, while in the second he does an Orwellian aboutface and denies it. Astounding!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQ04UjoErP4

I've posted two blog posts recently you may be interested in:
https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/blog/911-false-flag-or-psyop
https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/blog/911-controlled-demolition-as-propaganda
I've discovered that there is wall-to-wall 9/11 controlled opposition out there and this may be hard to believe but Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth are a government outfit - they want us all focused on the controlled demolition to divert our attention.

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Tim Eason
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 01:33:18 PM
@David Blomstrom: you just committed the fallacy fallacy.

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Tim Eason
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 01:48:37 PM
@Petra Liverani: you are appealing to your own incredulity as proof and using confirmation bias to define terms when multiple definitions may be applicable.

One part where your incredulity gives you a false belief that is obvious to me is your belief the jumper was fake. If 28 years of skydiving has taught me anything about the human body it’s what happens to it when it is rapidly decelerated by impact. Sometimes they look like they’re asleep, sometimes they’re a bag of crunchy jello, sometimes they hit so hard a wristwatch will sever their hand.
Just because you have no understanding of what happens to a human body when they go in doesn’t make it fake. (“Go in” is also a skydiving term because words can have more than one meaning)

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Petra Liverani
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 05:02:07 PM
@Tim Eason: I'm not sure this is the right fit logical fallacy wise but I'll go with strawman

"Go in" may be used in multiple contexts but with reference to building collapses it is used in the case of controlled demolition but not in fire. That's the only point of concern. If Brian had said "Can you confirm it was No 7 that just collapsed" I couldn't have made my point because collapse can be used for both collapses by fire and controlled demolition.

Apologies. It seems the link I provided changed where it linked to so I have uploaded the image to my website to ensure that the link goes to the correct image. https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/dead-body.html

You are correct in stating that I don't know what happens to the human body under impact and I would dearly love to view some photographs but I simply cannot find them on the internet, however, we can all distinguish human flesh from material and we can identify exit points. Admittedly, there could be exit points on the underside of the body that we cannot see but I think it's fair to say that the intestinal-looking stuff does not seem to have exited the body where we would expect. One thing we absolutely cannot argue is that - overall - the body looks real rather than fake. There is no way to argue that and I think that if we cannot argue that it looks real that is highly significant.

What you really want is to be able to argue against all or most of the points I present and present your own points favouring real death and injury, don't you? Picking weakness in one or two points is tantamount to cherry-picking in a sense, isn't it? My aim is to show that death and injury were staged. Either it was or it wasn't - true, it could have been in some instances but not others - but if that were the case then that is highly significant of itself. If you can pick weakness only in one or two points and you cannot present a single point that favours the real death and injury hypothesis considering the substantial body of evidence available then picking weakness in one or two points has little or no value, does it? And, of course, you haven't really picked weakness in either point - apologies though in relation to the body because the link didn't work as intended.

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David Blomstrom
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 08:41:30 PM
@Tim Eason: Thank you for deliberately ignoring the one word I wrote in CAPITAL letters - "EVIDENCE."

Back on planet Earth, we aren't talking about a simple argument that can be incorrectly labeled wrong just because sometime inadvertently says something fallacious.

The official 9/11 narrative is simply bristling with fallacies. The sheer number of fallacies makes intelligent people suspicious. If you disagree, then maybe you can explain where ideas like "lying politician" and "media whore" come from. There's a huge gulf between occasional inadvertent fallacious statements and deliberate and consistent lying.

And that's just one facet of 9/11. A commercial airliner hitting the Pentagon without being photographed, the commander-in-chief hiding in a classroom in Florida before fleeing to Nebraska, and on and on.

When a story contains that many speed bumps, propagandists have to work overtime. And when they can't come up with a rational argument, they resort to mind games, like accusing people of committing the "fallacy fallacy."

In plain English, you're committing the fallacy-fallacy fallacy.

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Petra Liverani
Friday, May 03, 2019 - 04:09:36 AM
The Conspiracy Theory fallacy is misnamed I think. Some would say that you couldn't get more incriminating than the collapse of WTC-7 on 9/11. There simply is no more perfect implosion that you can watch over and over again on YouTube. Some conspiracy theories may involve information that's hidden but the claims about 9/11 being an inside conspiracy are all based on scientific fact and clearly available evidence. Scientifically, all you need is the 2.25 seconds of free fall acceleration in the collapse of WTC-7 (agreed to by NIST) to prove than 9/11 was an inside conspiracy. Free fall acceleration in the collapse of WTC-7 could only have happened if all its 82 steel support columns failed at virtually the same time and for that to have happened they must have been cut by charges. There is absolutely no other possible explanation and there is certainly no evidence to cast doubt on this fact.

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Friday, May 03, 2019 - 06:17:10 AM
Some would say that you couldn't get more incriminating than the collapse of WTC-7 on 9/11.

Yes, conspiracy theorists. I will let others take the bait here.

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Petra Liverani
Friday, May 03, 2019 - 09:06:09 PM
I feel as if there's a bit of ad hominem here in "take the bait". It seems to imply I'm not serious in my argument and can simply be dismissed as a "conspiracy theorist". There is no addressing of my actual argument.

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 06:22:13 AM
@Petra Liverani: As stated, it is not the topic of this site to argue for or against conspiracy theories. This is a site about logical fallacies. See my comment above about posting in our forum. Members can evaluate your argument for fallacies and perhaps help you present it better.

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Petra Liverani
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 07:39:03 AM
@Bo Bennett, PhD: I take your point, however, I think my point remains: it seems to me that the conspiracy theory fallacy is a version of the appeal to ignorance fallacy but conspiracy theories can often be based on scientific evidence and one clear example is 9/11 as indicated by the groups Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth, Scientists for 9/11 Truth, Scholars for 9/11 Truth etc. The trouble with the term "conspiracy theory" is that it covers conspiracies which are extremely different in nature although the same people people may believe the very different kinds. For example, many people who recognise that 9/11 was an inside conspiracy also believe that astronauts didn't land on the moon whereas evidence supports we did land on the moon and all hoax arguments fail for one reason or another. I think it's because people tend to either believe everything that comes from the authorities or they believe nothing. Very few people in my experience judge every case purely by the evidence and I see all the logical fallacies on display in how people judge (admittedly, I just used one myself as you point out, however, that was really more carelessness - my logic stands strong by the simple deletion of the first sentence). Just a couple of days ago a friend used the "millions of people" people argument with me. When I told her that was the bandwagon logical fallacy she replied that in the particular argument we were having it applied. I'm like, "No a logical fallacy can never be used as an argument."

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 07:58:44 AM
@Petra Liverani: I think you are misunderstanding what this fallacy is about. It is

Explaining that your claim cannot be proven or verified because the truth is being hidden and/or evidence destroyed by a group of two or more people. When that reason is challenged as not being true or accurate, the challenge is often presented as just another attempt to cover up the truth and presented as further evidence that the original claim is true.

If you are claiming that you have scientific evidence for your position, you are not guilty of this fallacy. You still would be a "conspiracy theorist" by most people's understanding because you support a conspiracy theory. This label is different from the fallacy. Hope that is clear.

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Petra Liverani
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 09:08:52 AM
@Bo Bennett, PhD: I see. Thanks, however, I feel that the name of the fallacy does tend to, as do so many other things, help promote the idea that conspiracy theories are, by definition, bogus. I think of myself as a conspiracy analyst, not a conspiracy theorist. I'm not interested in potential conspiracies where I feel the available information is too little to make a judgement on, only those where it is sufficient - which, funnily enough, applies to many for a very counterintuitive reason ... but that's a whole other story.

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Saturday, May 04, 2019 - 09:11:21 AM
@Petra Liverani: Your opinion is noted.

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David Blomstrom
Monday, May 06, 2019 - 12:12:45 AM
@Petra Liverani: I'll have to ask you to review my book Conspiracy Science 101 when it's finished (sometime in the fall, hopefully). ;)

That said, I both agree and disagree with much of what you say. 9/11 was clearly an inside job, and the logic behind that claim is staring us right in the face. The sheer number of red flags is mind boggling; you have to be a circus acrobat to juggle all the inconsistencies in a story that was fabricated by people who are effectively professional liars.

However, I don't agree with your statement that killing people isn't the U.S. government's modus operandi. I had an interesting conversation with a co-worker from NYC that suggests some people may have indeed been warned not to go to work that day. So you could be correct in this case.

If true, however, I suspect only certain people were warned. Liars can claim the Pentagon was hit by a commercial airliner that wasn't even photographed, and they can claim the magically collapsing World Trade Center was just a fluke, but claiming that 3,000 people died with no bodies to back it up would be quite a stunt - not impossible, perhaps, but it just sounds a little far-fetched to me.

In fact, the U.S. government has never been shy about throwing people under the bus when it suits their purpose. The most infamous "false flag attacks" involved some pretty heavy fatalities.

There are also a number of aborted or failed conspiracies plotted by the U.S. and Israel that would have been pretty bloody had they been carried out. Examples include Operation Northwoods and the Lavon Affair. These aren't "fringe theory;" they're well substantiated, and are widely publicized.

Thank you for your interest in conspiracy analysis. We desperately need more people who haven't drunk the Kool-Aid. ;)

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Petra Liverani
Monday, May 06, 2019 - 02:26:09 AM
@David Blomstrom: Hi David, We probably shouldn't continue this discussion here - I'm going to post a question on the Q&A site ... just to say that I have very good logic, reason and evidence to back up my claim that death and injury were staged which you can find here.
https://occamsrazorterrorevents.weebly.com/3000-dead-and-6000-injured-a-lie.html

The secret to 9/11 is in the propaganda campaign - so clever. They could not but have anticipated the truthers, right, in fact, they almost "fostered" us by giving us WTC-7's collapse on a platter - it was completely unnecessary for the terror story. And then they almost gagged us with the truth of controlled demolition - so very much about CD. The reason? They transformed the truth liability of CD into a propaganda asset by using it to suppress the other very important truth - staged death and injury. So we have the disinfo agent "loved ones" such as Bob McIlvaine calling "CD" and "my son, Bobby, was killed", etc. With only half the truth of 9/11, truthers are hamstrung because no one will believe the US govt would kill those people in the buildings and they're right - they wouldn't cos not their MO and, of course, if 3,000 people really had died and 6,000 had been injured (we're talking 9,000 people) there'd be way more people kicking up a fuss than Bob and the 9/11 "Family Steering Committee", way, way more. And they'd be kicking up much, more more fuss than the very polite way they're carrying on. While people swallow propaganda, if reluctantly, under normal circumstances when a loved is murdered they go nuts.

If you're writing a book on conspiracy science you really need to go to my website as you'll find information you certainly won't find anywhere else. Pearl Harbour, the 1980 Bologna station bombing, 9/11 and the 2017 Mogadishu bombing all have something very much in common - bombings occurred ... but they were in an evacuated area. And, of course, there's more than those four - no doubt Oklahoma and others were too but I haven't yet studied them.

You will also find something else not well known - the power elite always tell us what they're up to - that's the really counterintuitive thing that people seem to have so much trouble believing but for which there is so much evidence. I had no problem believing it myself on hearing it from staged event analyst, Ole Dammegard, because it explained so many things that had previously baffled me, eg, Larry Silverstein's "pull it" (not that he ever would have really said that, of course, but it's a sign they give us).

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Tim Eason
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 01:48:13 PM
@Bo Bennett, PhD: is there no one who will call these comments out for stating arguments from incredulity?
Besides that confusion of what the conspiracy fallacy is (using the lack of evidence as proof of conspiracy) they are also making ad hominem attacks and offering proof by assertion.
I feel like they stumbled upon the wrong site while searching for conspiracy theories.
:/

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Petra Liverani
Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 07:03:11 AM
Here's a wonderful debunking of conspiracy theorists by Gerard Holmgren, a 9/11 research and analysis pioneer, who sadly died of an aggressive brain tumour at the age of 51.
http://serendipity.li/wot/holmgren01.htm

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Bo Bennett, PhD
Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 07:39:24 AM
sadly died of an aggressive brain tumour at the age of 51

Or did he????
:)

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