Question

...
Joe

statistics aren't x therefore the statistic is true

This is an interesting phenomena that I've observed, the format usually goes like this

P1: Makes claim, and supports that claim statistics.

P2: Rebuts P1 claims, outlines how the statistics is misleading/and or was collected in a biased manner.

P1: Statistics aren't [insert x] (for instance "racist"), therefore your premise is wrong.

Another side question I have is: someone makes sweeping generalization x, then when rebutted against they counter with, MOST of x are y, therefore my sweeping generalization is correct. The format of this will usually be:

P1: All liberals believe that killing babies is morally correct.

P2: On the instance of morality, not all liberals believe that, it is a sweeping generalization.

P3: Sure not all liberal believe that, but most  liberals do, making my original statement correct.

 

asked on Sunday, May 02, 2021 06:27:53 PM by Joe

Top Categories Suggested by Community

Comments

...
0
richard smith writes:

Statistics can be misleading or skewed to support a claim but are not morally biases. They are just numbers. It would be like calling your washing machine racist. You are trying to give human qualities to something that is not human.

The second one is moving the goal post.

 

posted on Monday, May 03, 2021 11:05:49 AM
...
0
Bill writes:

Every statistics textbook explains how to collect and analyze stats accurately. Yes, numbers are often misused. Or misinterpreted. 

posted on Monday, May 03, 2021 02:17:06 PM

Want to get notified of all questions as they are asked? Update your mail preferences and turn on "Instant Notification."

Master the "Rules of Reason" for Making and Evaluating Claims

Claims are constantly being made, many of which are confusing, ambiguous, too general to be of value, exaggerated, unfalsifiable, and suggest a dichotomy when no such dichotomy exists. Good critical thinking requires a thorough understanding of the claim before attempting to determine its veracity. Good communication requires the ability to make clear, precise, explicit claims, or “strong” claims. The rules of reason in this book provide the framework for obtaining this understanding and ability.

This book / online course is about the the eleven rules of reason for making and evaluating claims. Each covered in detail in the book

Take the Online Course

Answers

...
Rationalissimo
3

The first one is ignoratio elenchiNo one suggested that statistics were racist (they can't be), but they can be used in a racist manner to make arguments in favour of racist beliefs. However, even this wasn't necessarily the point of person 2; they were explaining how the stats were wrong.

The second example: first, note the misleading language (appeal to emotion). It's in the snuck premise "liberals believe killing babies is morally correct". What liberals actually support is abortion, which applies to foetuses. A baby could be anything between an embryo and a live new-born, but you'd be hard-pressed to find liberals who support "killing" the latter. So this isn't even a valid representation of what liberals believe, making it not only a desperate emotional appeal, but also a strawman fallacy. The use of "all" makes it even more fallacious, because there is no way to possibly know that (amazing familiarity).

Next, P1 claims that, while not "all" liberals do, "most" do, making the statement correct. This is still baseless (see my above analysis; pretty much no one supports just 'killing babies'). Also, "all" kinda means "all". If you're admitting that it's "most" instead, you're admitting your original statement was wrong. Thus, we have a non sequitur.

answered on Monday, May 03, 2021 03:20:14 AM by Rationalissimo

Rationalissimo Suggested These Categories

Comments

...
skips777
0

P1: All liberals believe that killing babies is morally correct.

P2: On the instance of morality, not all liberals believe that, it is a sweeping generalization.

P3: Sure not all liberal believe that, but most  liberals do, making my original statement correct.

Looks like moving the goal post maybe?.....or ad hoc rescue??

 

answered on Sunday, May 02, 2021 10:47:11 PM by skips777

skips777 Suggested These Categories

Comments